Things I've seen, Travel
Comments 8

Eat Well. Travel Often.

This poster by designer Ian Coyle speaks to me.

When I was 9 months old, my parents and I flew from Hong Kong to New Zealand. They moved to country they had never been to before with an infant. I can’t say I’d have the courage to do that. In the years since, we were lucky enough to travel back to Hong Kong fairly often. Usually we would travel with stopovers in other countries. I’ve been spoilt.

I find inspiration in travel. In both food and in design and in life. Travel gives perspective and nourishes in so many ways. I’d sooner blow all my cash on travel than save for a house. Being a homeowner is so overrated.

I hear so many stories of people who plan to travel in their retirement. Only they die young or are not physically enough when the time arrives. Which is why Gunther Holtorf’s story is so touching. Gunther Holtorf is a 74 year old German man, who, in 1989, following the fall of the Berlin Wall, packed up his Mercedes Benz G Wagen (he lovingly calls Otto) and his wife, Christine. They embarked on what was intended to be a 18 month trip through the continent of Africa. Twenty-three years later, his wife since passed away, Gunther is still traveling. Five hundred thousand miles, two hundred countries, one car. More recently he has been traveling through the same parts of Asia that I have been through.

Watch the narrated slideshow of his incredible journey over on the BBC news website here.

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I am Genie, a designer/photographer obsessed with food and bunnies. I live in Auckland, New Zealand with my husband, The Koala. I write about my hedonistic ways and I love the mantra "Eat well, travel often". I prefer not to write about myself in third person. www.bunnyeatsdesign.com

8 Comments

  1. Thanks for that Link Genie, how cool is that guy? I like that the paired the video with Tom Cochrane’s Life is a Highway (he’s Canadian, you know). You’re absolutely right, life is way too short not to travel. My Mom retired and the month after was diagnosed with a life threatening brain disorder. She and her husband traveled a lot the first couple of years, and then it became impossible. She lasted only 5 years after diagnosis (the last few were brutal). Enjoy it while you have it.

    • That’s so sad about your ma, Eva. I always think that blowing my money on travel could never be something I would regret. I think I could regret being tied down to a mortgage, even be resentful of it. It would be lovely to own a house, but if I have a choice (and I do), experience far outweighs “stuff”. I do wonder how it will work with more and more of my generation opting not to own houses. Does that mean rent eventually skyrockets? I’m not so good with economics…

  2. theliftblog says

    Incredible post and beautiful picture. I would love to travel more and as a teacher, I’ll be blessed enough to have 2 months off every summer. I intend to go somewhere different every summer. Africa is certainly on my list. Thank you for this inspiration! Cheers!

    • Oh! It would be great to be a teacher for those long summers off! I have friends and family that are teachers. The more exotic the better though, as otherwise you end up competing for the same destinations as your students and their families.

  3. That is so incredibly sad 😦 I agree, homeownership is overrated. I doubt we will ever be able to own a home in our lifetimes anyway. Can’t even buy a crap apartment in Sydney for under $300,000!

    • I wonder what our parents paid for their first house vs their yearly salary. Does it compare? I guess these days we push to live in the now rather than saving for the future. I don’t regret this, but it’s a very different world from when our parents were buying their first house.

      The good thing about renting is that we can up and leave with a few weeks notice. We should take advantage of this!

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